​Large cracks appear on French-era Mong Bridge in Saigon

The pedestrian bridge is over a century old

The Mong Bridge in Ho Chi Minh City. Photo: Tuoi Tre

Large cracks have been found on the iconic Mong Bridge connecting District 1 and District 4 in Ho Chi Minh City.  

The green pedestrian bridge is built across the Ben Nghe Canal, connecting Ben Chuong Duong Street in District 1 with Ben Van Don Street in District 4.

As of Sunday, multiple large cracks measuring between three and five centimeters in width and up to three meters long have appeared along the bridge’s access steps, abutments and concrete surfaces.

Most cracks are located on the District 4 half of the bridge.

A documentary on large cracks found on the Mong Bridge. Clip: Tuoi Tre News

According to Tuoi Tre (Youth) newspaper reporters’ observation on Sunday, an ongoing construction site to install anti-flooding drains was located just ten meters from the bridge.

Nguyen Vinh Ninh, director of Ho Chi Minh City’s Urban Traffic Management Zone 1, said on the day that inspections would be carried out to determine if the installation had anything to do with the cracks on the Mong Bridge, as well as to work out maintenance options.

The Mong Bridge is the only surviving pedestrian bridge in Ho Chi Minh City that was built during the French colonial period.

The steel construction measures 128 meters in length and 5.2 meters in width, and was built over a century ago by French merchant shipping company Messageries Maritimes.

The bridge underwent major renovation works in 2011, and started featuring decorative lighting in 2012.

It is a popular photo shooting and filming location for locals and foreign tourists.

Graffiti are seen on the wall of the access steps of the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Graffiti are seen on the wall of the access steps of the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Large cracks are seen on the steps of access steps of the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Large cracks are seen on the steps of access steps of the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Large cracks are seen on the steps of access steps of the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Large cracks are seen on the steps of access steps of the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A long crack appears on the abutment of the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A long crack appears on the abutment of the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A long crack appears on the abutment of the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A long crack appears on the abutment of the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A child climbs onto a lamp post on the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A child climbs onto a lamp post on the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A couple take photos on the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A couple take photos on the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A sign bearing the name of the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A sign bearing the name of the Mong Bridge. Photo: Tuoi Tre

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