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200 Ho Chi Minh City students practice calculating Earth’s circumference

Friday, March 22, 2019, 13:01 GMT+7
200 Ho Chi Minh City students practice calculating Earth’s circumference
Students note down how shadows move at Tran Khai Nguyen High School in Ho Chi Minh City, March 21, 2019. Photo: Nhu Hung / Tuoi Tre

A high school in Ho Chi Minh City has allowed more than 200 students to apply geography knowledge to real life situations by having them calculate the circumference of the Earth, rather than merely learning what’s in the textbooks.

The extracurricular activity, something rarely seen among schools in the Southeast Asian country, was held on Thursday morning by District 5-based Tran Khai Nguyen High School for its students and other high schools in the area, including Tran Huu Trang, Hung Vuong, and Suong Nguyet Anh.

Over 200 high school students were joined by physics and geography teachers in the extracurricular activity deliberately held on Equinox Day, a day which occurs twice a year when the plane of Earth’s equator passes through the center of the Sun.

During the outdoor session held on the grounds of Tran Khai Nguyen High School, the students were asked to calculate not only the circumference of Earth but also the distance from Ho Chi Minh City to the Equator.

Students calculate the circumference of the Earth at Tran Khai Nguyen High School in Ho Chi Minh City, March 21, 2019. Photo: Nhu Hung / Tuoi Tre
Students calculate the circumference of the Earth at Tran Khai Nguyen High School in Ho Chi Minh City, March 21, 2019. Photo: Nhu Hung / Tuoi Tre

The activity helped students understand the fundamental concepts of meteorology such as the shape of the Earth, how the Sun moves in the sky, how shadows change across the days in different seasons, according to Ngo Hung Cuong, vice headmaster of Tran Khai Nguyen High School.

More importantly, the session was an opportunity for students to implement the theories they learnt in different subjects including geography, meteorology, physics, and math into practical contexts, while also boosting their creativity and passion for science.

“Through this outdoor session we were able to place our knowledge into practical contexts, while it was also a good opportunity for us to learn from students from other schools,” Tran Quang Huy, a student from Thuc hanh Sai Gon High School, said excitedly.

Here are some of the photos of the session taken by Tuoi Tre's Nhu Hung:

An expert from the meteorology club of Ho Chi Minh City instructs students how to measure the Earth’s circumference at Tran Khai Nguyen High School in Ho Chi Minh City, March 21, 2019. Photo: Nhu Hung / Tuoi Tre
A teacher (left) helps students calculate the circumference of the Earth at Tran Khai Nguyen High School in Ho Chi Minh City, March 21, 2019. Photo: Nhu Hung / Tuoi Tre
A teacher (left) helps students calculate the circumference of the Earth at Tran Khai Nguyen High School in Ho Chi Minh City, March 21, 2019. Photo: Nhu Hung / Tuoi Tre
 
 
 
 

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