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A feast for the five senses in Vietnam's Ha Tinh and Quang Binh

A feast for the five senses in Vietnam's Ha Tinh and Quang Binh

Thursday, April 29, 2021, 11:17 GMT+7
A feast for the five senses in Vietnam's Ha Tinh and Quang Binh
Thien Cam Beach in Ha Tinh Province, Vietnam. Photo: Nam Tran / Tuoi Tre

The beaches in Ha Tinh and Quang Binh, two provinces in north-central Vietnam, are small in size compared to the better known Sam Son or Cua Lo in Thanh Hoa and Nghe An – their neighboring provinces.

Their coastline is encroached on by mountains of the majestic Truong Son Range.

Despite the dangerous terrain, local beaches embrace untouched beauties that can enchant any traveler at first sight.

The sandy Thach Hai Beach in Ha Tinh Province reaches its peak in summer with soapy white tides gently lapping the shore.

The sounds of wind and rubbing leaves harmonize into a lovely melody.

Some parts of it are densely covered with coconut trees, reminding travelers of getting lost in the tropical paradises of Bali in Indonesia or Phuket in Thailand.

Here and there, shabby houses are scattered along the coastline.

Ha Tinh Province is also home to another undiscovered beach named Ky Ninh.

Standing in front of the marvelous seascape, listening to the song of the Pacific Ocean and taking a deep breath of the sea, one might feel their sorrow and burden washed away in a moment. 

At the border of Ha Tinh and Quang Binh, on the historic Ngang Pass, a traveler can see Hoanh Son Beach lying by the impenetrable jungle.

It looks best at twilight when gentle breezes blow and clouds drift along the mountains.

Thien Cam Beach in Ha Tinh Province looks from afar. Photo: Nam Tran/Tuoi Tre

Thien Cam Beach in Ha Tinh Province, Vietnam. Photo: Nam Tran / Tuoi Tre

Untouched beauty

There are numerous no-name beaches between Ha Tinh and Quang Binh.

Each embraces the breathtaking, distinguished beauty.

Small sand coasts remain untamed, able to make any traveler experience the happiness of feeling like the first person to set eyes on it.

It is such a waste to pass through these beautiful beaches.

Instead, professional travelers will recommend setting up a camp and staying there overnight.

Nothing can compare to a night spent by a fire with good food, some cans of beers and a sky full of stars.

If one can resist the beauty of those no-name beaches, on the next journey down south, they will definitely stand in awe of Da Nhay Beach in Quang Binh Province.

Its name, literally translates as 'dancing rocks,' conveys the lively image of coastal rocks, dampened by seawater and vividly reflecting sunlight.

A rock looks like a mother hugging her child while another resembles a sea turtle.

Thousands of rocks trigger travelers’ imagination and senses.

Da Nhay Beach is also famous as an ideal place to relax after restless working days.

Da Nhay Beach in Quang Binh Province amazes travelers with strange-looking stones. Photo: Nguyen Huong / Tuoi Tre

Da Nhay Beach in Quang Binh Province amazes travelers with strange-looking stones. Photo: Nguyen Huong / Tuoi Tre

History lives on

Any beach along the coastline of Ha Tinh and Quang Binh has cultural heritage.

It was the journey of Vietnamese Princess Huyen Tran to the ancient country of Champa more than 700 years ago.

The tale of the princess whose marriage helped to expand the country down south is still told by local people.

In Quang Binh Province, then a border locality, she turned her head back for the last time, saying farewell to the motherland.

To remember the princess, local people named the province’s mother river as Nhat Le, meaning 'the splendor of sunlight,' which was usually used to imply the beauty of a lady.

Travellers visit Hoanh Son Quan, a construction on the peak of Ngang Pass connecting central provinces of Ha Tinh and Quang Binh. Photo: Nam Tran/Tuoi Tre

Travelers visit Hoanh Son Quan, a construction on the peak of Ngang Pass connecting Ha Tinh and Quang Binh, two provinces in north-central Vietnam. Photo: Nam Tran / Tuoi Tre

More than 50 years ago, sandy beaches in Quang Binh Province inspired Xuan Quynh -- Vietnam’s famous female poet in the 20th century -- to compose one of her most important poem collections named Gio Lao, Cat Trang (Southwest Monsoon, White Sand).

She wrote:

“At first, I did not feel anything

It was just sand and inferno-like wind

The scorching monsoon then became a memory as I left

And dry sand blended into love."

People purchase fishes at Thien Cam Beach in Ha Tinh Province . Photo: Nam Tran / Tuoi Tre

People purchase fish at Thien Cam Beach in Ha Tinh Province, Vietnam. Photo: Nam Tran / Tuoi Tre

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