JavaScript is off. Please enable to view full site.

Year's highest tide submerges roads in Ho Chi Minh City

Monday, November 16, 2020, 13:04 GMT+7
Year's highest tide submerges roads in Ho Chi Minh City
People travel on flooded Tran Xuan Soan Street in District 7, Ho Chi Minh City, November 15, 2020. Photo: Chau Tuan / Tuoi Tre

This year’s highest tide began submerging many areas in Ho Chi Minh City on Sunday and is expected to peak at dusk on Monday.

Statistics from the southern hydro-meteorological center showed that water levels at Nha Be Station reached 1.65 meters at 4:00 pm on Sunday, resulting in the inundation in many neighborhoods in the southern city. 

On Quoc Huong and Nguyen Van Huong Streets in District 2, authorities had to prepare water pumps to boost drainage capacity.

Tran Xuan Soan Street in District 7, Ho Chi Minh City is already inundated at 4:00 pm on November 15, 2020. Photo: Chau Tuan / Tuoi Tre

Tran Xuan Soan Street in District 7, Ho Chi Minh City was already inundated at 4:00 pm on November 15, 2020. Photo: Chau Tuan / Tuoi Tre

On Me Coc Street in District 8, residents had to use sandbags and other objects to prevent water from flowing into their houses.

Some people also expressed their concern that the ongoing water sanitation improvement project might exacerbate the flooding.

Several sections of Tran Xuan Soan Street in District 7 were submerged by floodwaters up to 0.5 meters deep, causing a lot of difficulties for commuters.

People travel on flooded Tran Xuan Soan Street in District 7, Ho Chi Minh City, November 15, 2020. Photo: Chau Tuan / Tuoi Tre

People travel on flooded Tran Xuan Soan Street in District 7, Ho Chi Minh City, November 15, 2020. Photo: Chau Tuan / Tuoi Tre

The situation also affected local businesses as the number of customers dropped significantly due to the flooding.

This is the highest tide to have hit Ho Chi Minh City so far this year, Le Dinh Quyet, an official of the southern hydro-meteorological center, told Tuoi Tre (Youth) newspaper.

The tide will peak late on Monday afternoon, with water levels at the Nha Be Station forecast to top 1.71 meters at 5:00 pm, Quyet elaborated.

Due to the effect of the northeast monsoon and strong waves at sea, the tidal water may rise higher than forecast, he added.

A woman walks on flooded Tran Xuan Soan Street in District 7, Ho Chi Minh City, November 15, 2020. Photo: Chau Tuan / Tuoi Tre

A woman walks on flooded Tran Xuan Soan Street in District 7, Ho Chi Minh City, November 15, 2020. Photo: Chau Tuan / Tuoi Tre

A resident travels on flooded Tran Xuan Soan Street in District 7, Ho Chi Minh City, November 15, 2020. Photo: Chau Tuan / Tuoi Tre

A resident travels on flooded Tran Xuan Soan Street in District 7, Ho Chi Minh City, November 15, 2020. Photo: Chau Tuan / Tuoi Tre

People travel on flooded Tran Xuan Soan Street in District 7, Ho Chi Minh City, November 15, 2020. Photo: Chau Tuan / Tuoi Tre

People travel on flooded Tran Xuan Soan Street in District 7, Ho Chi Minh City, November 15, 2020. Photo: Chau Tuan / Tuoi Tre

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Tuoi Tre News

More

Read more

;

Photos

VIDEOS

Vietnamese youngster travels back in time with clay miniatures

Each work is a scene caught by Dung and kept in his memories through his journeys across Vietnam

Experience summer sand-boarding in Mui Ne

Sand-boarding, a popular activity amongst local children in the coastal tourism town of Mui Ne in south-central Vietnam, is attracting hundreds of tourists to the Red Sand Dunes

Young maple trees given better protection as Hanoi enters rainy season

The trees are currently growing well, with green leaves and healthy branches.

Hunting skinks for food in southern Vietnam

Skink meat is known to be soft, tasty, and highly nutritious.

Vietnamese-made app allows people to grow real veggies via smartphone

Nguyen Thi Duyen, a young engineer in Hanoi, developed the app and its related services to help busy people create their own veggie gardens.

Latest news

Head for the hills in Vietnam’s Da Lat (P1)

The plateau upon which the city is built rises dramatically from less than 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) to 1,500 meters (5,000 feet), so the city appears surreal, with the only thing missing being a castle as in the fairy tales