Deteriorating mountain pass in central Vietnam alarms drivers

The Mimosa Pass is the main route for vehicles driving from the south toward Da Lat City

A section of Mimosa Pass in the Central Highlands province of Lam Dong is filled with potholes and rocks. Photo: Tuoi Tre

A mountain pass in Vietnam’s Central Highlands, a primary route toward the well-known city of Da Lat, has deteriorated badly, posing a threat to drivers.

Located south of Da Lat City in Lam Dong Province, the 11-kilometer Mimosa Pass is the route most used by vehicles traveling from the south.

According to Tuoi Tre (Youth) newspaper reporters, the road’s surface is filled with potholes.

Frequent travelers on the pass have said they are terrified by the potential risk, as accidents can easily happen if drivers fail to pay close attention.

“We have to travel as slowly as possible. Going too fast on the uneven surface can cause the vehicle to be knocked sideways,” truck driver Nguyen Dang Chau, said.

“It previously took me around 30 minutes to finish the pass. Now I have to spend up to an hour,” Chau added.

According to Nguyen Huu Nghiem, a driver from Ho Chi Minh City, the road is most dangerous at night as there are no street lights.

A truck travels in the wrong direction to avoid potholes along the pass.
A truck travels in the wrong direction to avoid potholes along the pass. Photo: Tuoi Tre

Le Thi Ky, a resident living at the foot of Mimosa Pass, said she picks up rocks from the road on a daily basis to prevent possible accidents.

The situation has been reported to the Lam Dong People’s Committee, Truong Huu Hiep, director of the provincial Department of Transport, said, adding that a solution is yet to be reached.

The transport department has suggested the allocation of VND500 million (US$ 22,014) as a temporary measure to fix the road.

The prime minister himself has previously tasked the Ministry of Transport with coordinating with the Lam Dong administration to turn Mimosa Pass into a national highway.

The path is blanketed with dust when large trucks use it.
The path is blanketed with dust when large trucks use it. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Le Thi Ky, a resident living at the foot of Mimosa Pass, collects rocks from the road.
Le Thi Ky, a resident living at the foot of Mimosa Pass, collects rocks from the roadway. Photo: Tuoi Tre
It is difficult for vehicles to travel on such an uneven surface.
It is difficult for vehicles to travel on such an uneven surface. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A truck tilts when traveling on the uneven street.
A truck tilts when traveling on the uneven roadway. Photo: Tuoi Tre

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