JavaScript is off. Please enable to view full site.

​Hidden-in-alley home décor shops charm people in Saigon

Saturday, July 14, 2018, 10:28 GMT+7
​Hidden-in-alley home décor shops charm people in Saigon
A corner by the windown inside "Nha co hai nguoi." Photo: Tuoi Tre

Small family-run home decoration shops in Saigon, the old name of Ho Chi Minh City, have emerged as captivating spots for décor lovers with abundant collections, ranging from kitchen accessories and utensils to home and office ornaments.

A common thing of these ornament-selling shops is that they give off vintage and peaceful, yet young and energetic, vibes.

Tuoi Tre (Youth) newspaper visits some of the top such shops in the southern hub.

Japanese-style pottery

One of the most popular addresses to décor lovers in Saigon is “Nha co hai nguoi,” or “House of two people,” run by a young couple over the last four years.

The small shop, located on a floor of an old apartment building on Nguyen Van Nguyen Street in District 1, is home to hundreds of Japanese-style decor items and lovely kitchen products.

Japanese-style pottery sold at
Japanese-style pottery sold at "Nha co hai nguoi." Photo: Tuoi Tre

Visitors to “Nha co hai nguoi” will be overwhelmed to see every corner, from the ground up to the window sill, full of pottery.

The ‘muddled’ arrangement under the glittering yellow light makes visitors fail to keep themselves from over-shopping.

Japanese-style pottery sold at
Japanese-style pottery sold at "Nha co hai nguoi." Photo: Tuoi Tre

Although the lady owner of “Nha co hai nguoi” still uploads photos of the products on its Facebook page, which has garnered more than 165,000 followers, it is hard to purchase the items online due to swift sold-out of the new arrivals.

It is thus recommended that visitors come to the store to make sure they will be able to bring home lovely products.

Japanese-style pottery sold at
Japanese-style pottery sold at "Nha co hai nguoi." Photo: Tuoi Tre

Wooden ornaments

Meanwhile, “Tap,” or Miscellaneous, is the result of a 26-year-old man abandoning his major in IT to open a wood workshop.

After several relocations, “Tap” was eventually located under a peaceful roof on Tran Khanh Du Street, also in District 1.

As its name suggests, “Tap” is not placed under any concept or idea, but based on the random arrangement of the young master.

Wooden ornaments sold at
Wooden ornaments sold at "Tap." Photo: Tuoi Tre

The workshop is covered in the warmth of the cool lemon yellow paint and delicate and hearty products.

Wooden ornaments sold at
Wooden ornaments sold at "Tap." Photo: Tuoi Tre

From a pen box to a cloud-shaped ornament, or a wooden elephant, all contain the ingenuity and meticulousness of a man who has a big love for his job.

Wooden ornaments sold at
Wooden ornaments sold at "Tap." Photo: Tuoi Tre

Now, more and more attention is given to the shop’s beautiful products made by the IT guy having a great taste of art.

Wooden ornaments sold at
Wooden ornaments sold at "Tap." Photo: Tuoi Tre

Desk plants and knick-knacks

Joy Garden is a tree shop located in a small alleyway on Hai Ba Trung Street of the urban zone in Ho Chi Minh City.

A few years ago, the owner of Joy Garden decided to abandon his chosen field of study to switch to bonsai business.

The front of Joy Garden. Photo: Tuoi Tre
The front of Joy Garden. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Desk plants sold at Joy Garden. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Desk plants sold at Joy Garden. Photo: Tuoi Tre

Joy Garden's products focus on a number of popular plants such as cactus, mini and artificial succulents, aroid palm, laceleaf planted in pots, which are decorated with adorable images in the lovely “chibi” art style – a part of Japanese culture used in anime and manga.

Plant pots are decorated with adorable images in the lovely “chibi” art style at Joy Garden. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Plant pots are decorated with adorable images in the lovely “chibi” art style at Joy Garden. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A staff draws an adorable image in the lovely “chibi” art style at Joy Garden. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A staff draws an adorable image in the lovely “chibi” art style at Joy Garden. Photo: Tuoi Tre

Décor lovers can take another option to visit The Craft House, where many cute ornaments including notebooks, greeting cards, bonsai, and essential oils are sold.

The Craft House is a great place for those who want to rearrange their own space with the miscellaneous but lovely adornment items.

Knick-knacks sold at The Craft House. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Knick-knacks sold at The Craft House. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A pot of desk plant sold at The Craft House. Photo: Tuoi Tre
A pot of desk plant sold at The Craft House. Photo: Tuoi Tre

"Every time I come here, I am always impressed with the pretty eye-catching and cute items,” said Minh Chau, a 21-year-old student of Hoa Sen University.

Knick-knacks sold at The Craft House. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Knick-knacks sold at The Craft House. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Wooden knick-knacks sold at The Craft House. Photo: Tuoi Tre
Wooden knick-knacks sold at The Craft House. Photo: Tuoi Tre

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Bao Anh / Tuoi Tre News

More

Read more

;

Photos

VIDEOS

Experience summer sand-boarding in Mui Ne

Sand-boarding, a popular activity amongst local children in the coastal tourism town of Mui Ne in south-central Vietnam, is attracting hundreds of tourists to the Red Sand Dunes

Young maple trees given better protection as Hanoi enters rainy season

The trees are currently growing well, with green leaves and healthy branches.

Hunting skinks for food in southern Vietnam

Skink meat is known to be soft, tasty, and highly nutritious.

Vietnamese-made app allows people to grow real veggies via smartphone

Nguyen Thi Duyen, a young engineer in Hanoi, developed the app and its related services to help busy people create their own veggie gardens.

Chinese tourists hit by Vietnamese over dine and dash

Four Chinese were reportedly injured, with one having a broken arm.

Latest news

Out of sight…

I recently wrote an article about the cost of living for an expat retiree in Vietnam and discovered during research that I was spending money on things out of habit, not need