JavaScript is off. Please enable to view full site.

Endangered langurs born in captivity returned to wild in northern Vietnam

Endangered langurs born in captivity returned to wild in northern Vietnam

Friday, August 28, 2020, 15:48 GMT+7
Endangered langurs born in captivity returned to wild in northern Vietnam
A family of Delacour’s langurs in captivity at the endangered primate rescue center of Cuc Phuong National Park in Ninh Binh Province, Vietnam. Photo: Four Paws Viet

Three critically endangered Delacour's langurs were released into the wild in the northern Vietnamese province of Ninh Binh on Thursday.

Cuc Phuong National Park, in cooperation animal welfare organization Four Paws Viet, transferred the Delacour’s langurs (Trachypithecus delacouri) to the Trang An Scenic Landscape Complex in the province for the release.

The three langurs are a family that were born in captivity at the endangered primate rescue center of Cuc Phuong National Park.

The father langur’s name is Huynh, the mother’s name is Emily, and their baby is Bonny.

Before their release, they were sampled for tests for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, tuberculosis, and some other diseases as per international standards.

Conservation workers transfer a family of Delacour’s langurs to the Trang An Scenic Landscape Complex for their release in Ninh Binh Province, Vietnam. Photo: Four Paws Viet

Conservation workers transfer a family of Delacour’s langurs to the Trang An Scenic Landscape Complex for their release in Ninh Binh Province, Vietnam. Photo: Four Paws Viet

The Delacour’s langurs were also brought to semi-wild areas to be trained in order to develop their natural behaviors.

Their growth and development during the training process were monitored thanks to electronic chips implanted in their bodies.

The Delacour’s langur is classified as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

The Trang An Scenic Landscape Complex used to host Delacour’s langurs during the 1990s, though their numbers were wiped out by poaching.

Releasing the langurs back into the naural habitat would not only create an attractive highlight for visitors to the site, but also raise public awareness of conservation.

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Tuoi Tre News

More

Read more

;

Photos

VIDEOS

Vietnamese woman gives unconditional love to hundreds of adopted children

Despite her own immense hardship, she has taken in and cared for hundreds of orphans over the past three decades.

Vietnam’s Mekong Delta celebrates spring with ‘hat boi’ performances

The art form is so popular that it attracts people from all ages in the Mekong Delta

Vietnamese youngster travels back in time with clay miniatures

Each work is a scene caught by Dung and kept in his memories through his journeys across Vietnam

Latest news

The shortcut generation in Vietnam

Per standard Vietnamese road etiquette, anybody stopping for anybody is a miracle, a sight to behold, with the driver’s polite gesture being the absolute pinnacle of respect