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Hair donation program brings optimism to cancer patients in Vietnam

Hair donation program brings optimism to cancer patients in Vietnam

Thursday, July 07, 2022, 10:29 GMT+7
Hair donation program brings optimism to cancer patients in Vietnam
A hairdresser cuts Lo Thi Bao Nhi’s hair for donation to cancer patients.

As many cancer patients lose all their hair during treatment, some young people donate theirs to these patients through a meaningful campaign run by Breast Cancer Network Vietnam (BCNV). 

The campaign has attracted many in Ho Chi Minh City. 

Giving hair a new life 

Hoang Oanh, 26, in Go Vap District, decided to donate her hair to cancer patients when she learned about the campaign through the Facebook page of BCNV. 

“Two years ago, I wished to give away my hair but it did not meet their requirements," Oanh recalled.

“Since then, I have nourished my hair to be able to bring more joy to cancer patients.

“It is inconvenient sometimes to deal with long hair, but I get over that when thinking about the purpose."

She has grown her hair for more than four years.

Initially, she felt a little bit nervous to get a free haircut.

However, the hairdresser was very nice and styled her hair carefully, Oanh said. 

Poor cancer patients find it hard to pay for their medicines, let alone a wig.

Vietnamese have a saying that teeth and hair are the most attractive and beautiful features.

Cancer patients who lose their hair may lose their confidence as well, so hair donations to make wigs mean a lot to them. 

Donating hair first, blood later

Hoang Thi Ngoc Bich, mother of Lo Thi Bao Nhi, 16, from northern Lai Chau Province, found out about the hair donation campaign through her friend’s Facebook.

She then told her daughter about cancer patients who lost their hair because of chemotherapy. 

Bich suggested her daughter Nhi donate her long hair. The girl agreed without any hesitation.

Phan Vu Thu Trang looks beautiful with her new hairstyle after donating her long hair to cancer patients.

Phan Vu Thu Trang looks beautiful with her new hairstyle after donating her long hair to cancer patients in Vietnam.

“My husband and I donate blood every year. My daughter wanted to do that but she was underage," Bich shared.

“She felt happy knowing that she would do a good thing."

She let her daughter grow her hair when she was a first-grade student.

When seeing Nhi’s long, beautiful hair, the hairdresser told Bich and her daughter they should not cut her hair.

However, Nhi said her hair would grow long again.

Instead of donating 25- or 30-centimeter hair, Nhi was willing to donate 45 centimeters of her hair.  

“I hope that the hair donation campaign will be better known to everyone,” said Bich. 

Those who have strong hair can gift at least 25 centimeters while others who have their hair permed, dyed or straightened can give 35 centimeters or more.

Each handmade wig needs real hair from five to 10 people. 

Spreading positivity

Phan Vu Thu Trang, a marketer in Ho Chi Minh City, said she had just donated her hair, hoping that more and more people like her can help cancer patients feel optimistic in their fight against the disease.    

Trang attended a BCNV event where she realized that long or short hair is not important to most people, but hair can bring joy to cancer patients. 

She grew her hair three years ago and had prepared for the hair donation for six months.

“I carefully checked my hair’s length before cutting it," she said.

“When I was a student, I wanted to donate my hair but it was not long enough.

"Therefore, this is the first time I have donated my hair.

“There will be many more times."

Established in 2015, the wig library project run by BCNV has plans to open 40 wig libraries nationwide.

Hair donation helps cancer patients retain their confidence and cheer them up during treatment.

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

As many cancer patients lose all their hair during treatment, some young people donate theirs to these patients through a meaningful campaign run by Breast Cancer Network Vietnam (BCNV). 

The campaign has attracted many in Ho Chi Minh City. 

Giving hair a new life 

Hoang Oanh, 26, in Go Vap District, decided to donate her hair to cancer patients when she learned about the campaign through the Facebook page of BCNV. 

“Two years ago, I wished to give away my hair but it did not meet their requirements," Oanh recalled.

“Since then, I have nourished my hair to be able to bring more joy to cancer patients.

“It is inconvenient sometimes to deal with long hair, but I get over that when thinking about the purpose."

She has grown her hair for more than four years.

Initially, she felt a little bit nervous to get a free haircut.

However, the hairdresser was very nice and styled her hair carefully, Oanh said. 

Poor cancer patients find it hard to pay for their medicines, let alone a wig.

Vietnamese have a saying that teeth and hair are the most attractive and beautiful features.

Cancer patients who lose their hair may lose their confidence as well, so hair donations to make wigs mean a lot to them. 

Donating hair first, blood later

Hoang Thi Ngoc Bich, mother of Lo Thi Bao Nhi, 16, from northern Lai Chau Province, found out about the hair donation campaign through her friend’s Facebook.

She then told her daughter about cancer patients who lost their hair because of chemotherapy. 

Bich suggested her daughter Nhi donate her long hair. The girl agreed without any hesitation.

Phan Vu Thu Trang looks beautiful with her new hairstyle after donating her long hair to cancer patients.

Phan Vu Thu Trang looks beautiful with her new hairstyle after donating her long hair to cancer patients in Vietnam.

“My husband and I donate blood every year. My daughter wanted to do that but she was underage," Bich shared.

“She felt happy knowing that she would do a good thing."

She let her daughter grow her hair when she was a first-grade student.

When seeing Nhi’s long, beautiful hair, the hairdresser told Bich and her daughter they should not cut her hair.

However, Nhi said her hair would grow long again.

Instead of donating 25- or 30-centimeter hair, Nhi was willing to donate 45 centimeters of her hair.  

“I hope that the hair donation campaign will be better known to everyone,” said Bich. 

Those who have strong hair can gift at least 25 centimeters while others who have their hair permed, dyed or straightened can give 35 centimeters or more.

Each handmade wig needs real hair from five to 10 people. 

Spreading positivity

Phan Vu Thu Trang, a marketer in Ho Chi Minh City, said she had just donated her hair, hoping that more and more people like her can help cancer patients feel optimistic in their fight against the disease.    

Trang attended a BCNV event where she realized that long or short hair is not important to most people, but hair can bring joy to cancer patients. 

She grew her hair three years ago and had prepared for the hair donation for six months.

“I carefully checked my hair’s length before cutting it," she said.

“When I was a student, I wanted to donate my hair but it was not long enough.

"Therefore, this is the first time I have donated my hair.

“There will be many more times."

Established in 2015, the wig library project run by BCNV has plans to open 40 wig libraries nationwide.

Hair donation helps cancer patients retain their confidence and cheer them up during treatment.

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Vuong Anh - Duyen Phan / Tuoi Tre News

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