JavaScript is off. Please enable to view full site.

Last living imperial maid of Vietnam’s feudalism era dies at 102

Last living imperial maid of Vietnam’s feudalism era dies at 102

Tuesday, February 23, 2021, 16:59 GMT+7
Last living imperial maid of Vietnam’s feudalism era dies at 102
Le Thi Dinh (third left) is seen in a photo with Empress Dowager Tu Cung in a photo supplied by culture expert Trinh Bach.

Le Thi Dinh, the last concubine of the Nguyen imperial dynasty in Vietnam, has passed away at the age of 102.

Her death was confirmed by culture expert Trinh Bach on Monday.

Dinh was the maternal grandchild of Kien Quan Cong (Duke Kien), the youngest sibling of several Nguyen emperors, including Dong Khanh, Kien Phuc, and Ham Nghi, which made him the youngest cousin of Dong Khanh’s son, Emperor Khai Dinh.

She was sent to the Nguyen Dynasty court in central Hue City from an early age as a servant for Empress Dowager Tu Cung, Emperor Bao Dai’s mother.

After the success of the August Revolution in 1945, which abolished the reign of feudalism in Vietnam, Dinh followed Tu Cung to serve her at An Dinh Palace on modern-time Hue City’s Phan Dinh Phung Street.

After the death of Tu Cung in 1980, Dinh moved to Kien Thai Vuong Temple in Hue along with her sons to take charge of altar maintenance for Emperors Dong Khanh, Kien Phuc, Ham Nghi, Khai Dinh, and Bao Dai.

Dinh was considered the last living imperial maid of the Nguyen Dynasty, who was also the last surviving eyewitness to the artisan crafting process, among other procedures in the Vietnamese imperial court.

Vo Le Nhat, director of the Hue Royal Vestiges Preservation Center, said the agency will help cremate Dinh’s body upon her family's request.

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Le Thi Dinh, the last concubine of the Nguyen imperial dynasty in Vietnam, has passed away at the age of 102.

Her death was confirmed by culture expert Trinh Bach on Monday.

Dinh was the maternal grandchild of Kien Quan Cong (Duke Kien), the youngest sibling of several Nguyen emperors, including Dong Khanh, Kien Phuc, and Ham Nghi, which made him the youngest cousin of Dong Khanh’s son, Emperor Khai Dinh.

She was sent to the Nguyen Dynasty court in central Hue City from an early age as a servant for Empress Dowager Tu Cung, Emperor Bao Dai’s mother.

After the success of the August Revolution in 1945, which abolished the reign of feudalism in Vietnam, Dinh followed Tu Cung to serve her at An Dinh Palace on modern-time Hue City’s Phan Dinh Phung Street.

After the death of Tu Cung in 1980, Dinh moved to Kien Thai Vuong Temple in Hue along with her sons to take charge of altar maintenance for Emperors Dong Khanh, Kien Phuc, Ham Nghi, Khai Dinh, and Bao Dai.

Dinh was considered the last living imperial maid of the Nguyen Dynasty, who was also the last surviving eyewitness to the artisan crafting process, among other procedures in the Vietnamese imperial court.

Vo Le Nhat, director of the Hue Royal Vestiges Preservation Center, said the agency will help cremate Dinh’s body upon her family's request.

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get the latest news about Vietnam!

Tuoi Tre News

More

Read more

;

Photos

VIDEOS

‘Taste of Australia’ gala dinner held in Ho Chi Minh City after 2-year hiatus

Taste of Australia Gala Reception has returned to the Park Hyatt Hotel in Ho Chi Minh City's District 1 after a two-year hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic

Vietnamese woman gives unconditional love to hundreds of adopted children

Despite her own immense hardship, she has taken in and cared for hundreds of orphans over the past three decades.

Vietnam’s Mekong Delta celebrates spring with ‘hat boi’ performances

The art form is so popular that it attracts people from all ages in the Mekong Delta

Vietnamese youngster travels back in time with clay miniatures

Each work is a scene caught by Dung and kept in his memories through his journeys across Vietnam

Latest news